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I met Dominic Kiarie when I was working for British American Asset Managers (BAAM).

I had just gotten a job as a Financial Advisor, with no previous experience in unit trust and kept wondering how I would ever be able to bring into the company the minimum investment of Kshs 200,000. 

Dominic was the Managing Director and as was the norm, would give a speech to all new recruits. 

I expected the conventional speech. You know the "if you don't reach your target, we will be forced to let you go" speech or maybe the speech that talks greatly about the company and how lucky we were to have been recruited. But that was not the case.

Kiarie gave the most inspiring speech I have lived to tell. He never spoke about the company, his focus was on us as individuals and our dreams. He inspired me and gave me the zeal to succeed. Eventually this lady who had no previous experience in unit trust and saw Ksh 200,000 as a mountain, ended up bringing 1 million during her first week with the company. I remember coming to the office and seeing an email from him to all staff congratulating the new girl. It was an awesome feeling. The support system at BAAM was excellent. It was great working for such a company amidst the fast paced industry in which we worked in.

Unfortunately, not many people have had the opportunity to work with great leaders. Todays' leaders are completely disconnected with reality despite their high achievement. One would actually think that the higher the position, the more disengaged they are with reality. They seem to be in a world of their own, making decision based on their perception. Ring a bell?

Leaders also seem to do a great job at lowering the self-esteem of their staff and frustrating them. Yet it is always easier and cheaper to train staff than recruit new ones. 

I have compiled a list of things to do to lose quickly good employees. Keep it up and they won't stay much longer.

  1. Do not listen to your employees: after all the boss has all the answers. Ignore the feedback from your staff. Make decision without their input and see them leave.
  2. Pay them poorly and give them no benefits: a friend of mine once told me that he would never take up a job that does not pay his children education. Looking at his professional status, i agree. With the decline in GDP, many employees are unable to pay their bills and are forced to look for a 'side-hustle' to complement their income. The less paid employees are, the fewer benefits they have, the most likely they are to leave an organization.
  3. Follow a very hierarchical system: where employees are unable to air their opinion but instead implement the decisions taken by their bosses.
  4. Do not train or let them grow: most employees aspire to grow. If they lack a particular skill, they want to learn and work in a company that build their capacity. Unfortunate most companies are busy obsessing about profit or the lack of it and see capacity building as a waste of resources.
  5. Criticize and always pinpoint the negative: a clear depiction of boss versus leader.
  6. Do not train or let them grow: most employees aspire to grow. If they lack a particular skill, they want to learn and build their capacity. Unfortunate most companies are busy obsessing with their profit or lack of it and view capacity building as a waste of resources. 
  7. Criticize and always pinpoint the negative: a clear depiction of boss versus leader.
  8. Do not care about people: believe it or not, some bosses are simply not people oriented. They are unable to communicate effectively or to just care. They create an environment of constant battles between staff.
  9. Create uncertainty in the workplace: Ever worked for an organization where you constantly wonder if you will be fired today or the company will shut down? Well then you know what I am referring to. This at the beginning propels the employee to work harder. However, with time, they get tired and leave. Employees desire security.